Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
How to reduce prims mesh when hitting the ground?
#1
Hello friends, I ask for help again.
I have already given up on the skin palette, but now I am trying to figure out how to reduce the impact of the prims mesh on the ground, without blurring them from afar. That is, if someone knows how to reduce it, for example, a house that has 200 prims to 1 or 2 or 7. I have seen many primes that are reduced, but do not know how it is done, please, I would appreciate someone telling me how Can be done.
Thank you
Reply
#2
Slightly confused by what you are asking. The big way to reduce the impact of prims is to turn it into mesh, that can save a lot, and may be what you are talking about? You can't really reduce land impact of mesh unless when you upload it you mess with the LOD settings, and that's kind of trial and error, at least for me, I still don't quite understand that, but there are tutorials on both on the forum.
Reply
#3
The only way to reduce the land impact of an object is to reduce the object's complexity. The blurring I think you're referring to is the lower stages of LOD (Level of Detail). It's one of the ways that complexity is reduced in SL. Mesh objects in Second Life have multiple levels of detail, ranging from full-quality to lowest. Many content creators will use very low detail at the lower settings because of the savings it affords, and because very few users will care about the lack of detail from the distance these levels usually trigger. This can be done either by using Second Life's built-in LOD values when uploading a mesh, or by manually designing lower-quality versions to upload on your own. It's worth noting that LOD scales not only based on distance, but also based on the size of a mesh. In other words, large objects such as statues and cars will require the camera to be further than say a piece of jewelry.
Reply
#4
work other way around
Start from extremely low poly model that you will use for physics (which is a must for buildings) and then subdivide up filling up LOD levels with final build that will have most verts/polys. That way your build will not decimate beyond recognition on lower LODS and will not take fuckload of prims (and no, you cannot have a house with 1LI and reasonable LOD resistance
- Hey mate, what is causing "stack heap collision" error?
- Probably four people in a threesome...
Reply
#5
Working from low-to-high is an option, but for most things I find that starting high and cutting back detail is easier. It gives you the ability to work in a more free-form way that doesn't bog you down with trying to figure out the details, and topology for something you're still trying to figure out the design on.

I find that working on structures, and mostly flat geometry, the low-to-high approach is fine. But for anything more detailed, organic, etc., the more conventional high poly to low poly workflow works best. My usual workflow looks something like:

- Sketch up a sculpt in ZBrush/Blender.
- Retopo sculpt into clean mesh in Blender.
- Assign materials as needed (if something needs to be tintable, for example)
- UV Unwrap, bake textures
- Design textures in Photoshop and/or in Substance
- Import into Blender and cut detail out for the first (sometimes second) LOD states.
- Import into Second Life, and use the absolute lowest automatic LOD value for the lowest state (making it basically garbage at 0)

For most things, this works really well at creating quality content quickly, and it gives you the ability to even use your high-poly mesh to bake normal maps onto your low poly in the event that you're working with materials. It can be a bit daunting if you're new though, since it feels like you have to create the same model twice (high poly, and low), but when compared to other work flows, it's actually much faster. Plus, it gives you a 3D model to sort of 'trace' your topology on, which is like having 3D reference art to build on afterwards!
Reply
#6
Rainbow 
Merlina is right - it always takes a few trial/error cycles.

Let me share my recipe.  

Let's say, after you make sure your model is absolutely clean, you end up with a house with 7500 Triangles.

For Medium LOD i go:   Use LOD above
For Low and Lowest i usually try limit to 100 triangles.

This produces a very strong LOD.

You really want to develop your own Physics Model that is really bare minimum,  no details, just floors and walls, doors, and the bounding box.  You save those few polygons as a separate dae and upload it with the house model (Physics tab, Step 1, load From File.)

[Image: yeVNsbk.png]


Also, it really REALLY makes sense to upload a model like a house in separate chunks; the chunks are being divided intelligently to achieve the smallest bounding box for these pieces.  This way you might be able to save on Physics quite significantly.


Good luck!

pony
Reply
#7
(05-08-2018, 07:12 AM)dancinggirl Wrote: Guests cannot see links in the messages. Please register to forum by clicking here to see links.Merlina is right - it always takes a few trial/error cycles.

Let me share my recipe.  

Let's say, after you make sure your model is absolutely clean, you end up with a house with 7500 Triangles.

For Medium LOD i go:   Use LOD above
For Low and Lowest i usually try limit to 100 triangles.

This produces a very strong LOD.

You really want to develop your own Physics Model that is really bare minimum,  no details, just floors and walls, doors, and the bounding box.  You save those few polygons as a separate dae and upload it with the house model (Physics tab, Step 1, load From File.)

[Image: yeVNsbk.png]


Also, it really REALLY makes sense to upload a model like a house in separate chunks; the chunks are being divided intelligently to achieve the smallest bounding box for these pieces.  This way you might be able to save on Physics quite significantly.


Good luck!

pony
Reply
#8
dancinggirl's screenshot shows more or less how I upload 99% of my mesh. In my experience, people will generally favor the massive savings you get towards Land Impact using this method, over the distortion it causes from viewing at great distance.

Another trick I've found that comes in really handy, is to create a custom LOD mesh for low and lowest which uses very tiny, near-impossible to see triangles at the top-left and bottom-right of the object's bounding box. This way, when the mesh is viewed from far away, it seems to just disappear, instead of leaving behind a garbled mess. A rough example of their placement looks something like (triangles selected for visibility, and doodled to make it obvious what's going on):

[Image: NmKt3iL.png]
Reply
#9
Rainbow 
@o.m.g.itsme Oh that's a cool trick.  I'll try that.

Thank you!

pony
Reply
#10
good to know for future reference!
Reply


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  3D mesh cloath web site free to download svabo112 0 59 Yesterday, 11:43 PM
Last Post: svabo112
  I am looking for a old MillionHeels mesh set of shoes. Moonie 4 240 07-17-2019, 02:35 AM
Last Post: Glide Beaumont
  Full Male Mesh Head Studio saphsback 5 548 04-28-2019, 08:15 AM
Last Post: saphsback
  Req: Toddleedoo Mesh KAYLEELEE 40 24,073 04-07-2019, 06:56 AM
Last Post: SpringSun80
  How to apply skin uuids for Genus Mesh Head sashagrayson 6 1,278 03-31-2019, 09:50 AM
Last Post: titubiaz



Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)